Carved pumpkin decorated with acrylic paint

Sugar Skulls in the Making

Moulded Sugar Skulls

We did decorate the skulls but they were eaten before we could snap a picture!

Last week at Caoba Towers we had a crack at making sugar skulls in preparation for the Day of the Dead. We used silicone moulds that we bought on line and ready-made fondant/sugar paste (Mary Berry may not approve, but we love the stuff). If you search online for tips on making your own sugar skulls you’ll find lots of instructions for making a sugar paste, but many of them say don’t try making the paste on a rainy day as it won’t dry hard enough. They clearly don’t live in Scotland. As I said, we used ready-made fondant.

There are some fabulous examples of sugar skull making online; Pinterest has some particularly fine pictures and how-to tutorials which you can adapt to suit your own environment.

This week we tried a different method of skull-making; pumpkin carving.

Carved pumpkin decorated with acrylic paint

Carved pumpkin decorated with acrylic paint

Any good illustration can act as a guide for your paring knife and paint brush. Leave the pumpkin bare or paint on a decorated skull using opaque acrylic paint* as we did here.

If you’re feeling more decorative than creative then sugar skulls in various media are available at Caoba, in store and online. We have Alexander Henry fabrics by the metre or made up into aprons and cushions, papier maché cocktail sticks, skull and skeleton wind chimes and more.

Blue Sugar Skull fabric

Alexander Henry Blue Sugar Skull fabric available from Caoba

*NB if you want to eat your sugar skulls DON’T use acrylic paint, it is most definitely not edible.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


× 8 = sixteen